Vancouver International Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

Tayeba Begum Lipi: Unveiling

Tayeba Begum Lipi, Unveiling Womanhood (video still), 2017. Courtesy of the artist.

November 15, 2019 – December 14, 2019

Closing Reception: December 14, 2019, 4 – 6 PM

Tayeba Begum Lipi’s work engages an embodied inquiry into the transitioning of sociocultural and sociopolitical realities. The work, Unveiling Womanhood, in this exhibition draws on the ideology of oppression in Bangladesh, further unravelling issues of female marginality, colourism, enforced female beauty standards, and the male gaze. This single-channel video work cerebrates the language of impediment, executed similarly but constructed differently across the continents.

Based in Bangladesh, Lipi’s multimedia practice often reflects the everyday life that a woman has to endure. She is known for her feminist concerns that sharply criticize the tenuous nature of our social constructions. Unveiling Womanhood was previously exhibited in her solo exhibition This is What I Look(ed) Like at Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, earlier this year, and at the Kathmandu Triennale 2017, revolving around the contemporary issues of female identity from an autobiographical standpoint.

Lipi’s works have been featured on local, regional, and global scales. Venues that highlight her artistic career include the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, Shanghai Modern Art Museum, Museum Arnhem, the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University, and the Taiwan National Museum of Fine Art. She has contributed to the 14th Jakarta Biennale in 2011, the 2012 Colombo Art Biennale, the 2012 & 2014 Dhaka Art Summit, and 56th Venice Biennale in 2015. She was one of the commissioners of the Pavilion of Bangladesh at the 54th Venice Biennale in 2011.

Lipi was the artist-in-residence at the Irish Museum of Modern Art, the Art Council of Central Finland, and Gallery 68elf in Cologne, in 2000. She won a Grand Prize at the 11th Asian Art Biennale Bangladesh in 2003, Dhaka. Coming from a drawing and painting background, she is the co-founder of Britto Arts Trust; the first artist-run and non-profit organization that promotes a diverse range of critical inquiries in the contemporary art scene of Bangladesh.

This is the artist’s first exhibition in Canada.

Curated by Mohammad Zaki Rezwan

Centre A and Mohammad Zaki Rezwan thank the School for the Contemporary Arts, Simon Fraser University for its support.


Accessibility: The gallery is wheelchair and walker accessible. If you have specific accessibility needs, please contact us at (604) 683-8326 or info@centre.org.

Centre A is situated on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded Coast Salish territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples. We honour, respect, and give thanks to our hosts.

Unstable Oscillation

November 7 – December 14, 2019

Opening Reception: November 7, 2019, 6 – 8 PM | Remarks: 6:30 PM

Unstable Oscillation brings together works of two Seoul-based artists, Dahye Kim and Ye Eun Nam. In this exhibition, the artists respond to a turbulent material world that they have not been part of just yet, by embedding their imagination into the objects of their choice. The trajectory of objects in Seoul, pristine new things piling on top of the ‘fossil’ of existing ones, is affecting our behaviour and perception of materials evident through industrial production, distribution structures, and digital interfaces.

Imagining a hypothetical space to be infused with non-chronological, or fictional contexts and materials, Dahye Kim recreates images of variable sizes on a social media platform, tweaking the way of seeing in a digital interface. The work signals a physical boundary manifested through materiality. Materials such as lemon squeezers, balloons, shower curtains, and teddy bears have flown into the exhibition space and coexisted with the religious decoration.

Ye Eun Nam searches for a sense of speed and navigation in how one adapts into and perceives a material environment through installation and painting. Reacting to her immediate environment consisting of sewing businesses in Seogye-dong, Seoul near her studio, Nam collects subsidiary fabrics that are discarded on the streets. Questioning about the distribution of only a limited amount of fabric and clothing designs, and wearing and sharing those within Seoul, the artist explores the sense of individuality and collectivism.

This exhibition is part of an ongoing collaboration between Centre A and the RAT school of ART, a membership program for artists in Seoul, South Korea.

The Canada-Korea Residency and Exchange program highlights the role of contemporary artists in making space for collaborative relationships, critical conversations, and cultural productivity across national borders.

This exhibition is co-sponsored by the Gyeonggi Cultural Foundation (Seoul, South Korea) and supervised by Henry Heng Lu, Yun-Jou Chang, and Mijoo Park.


Accessibility: The gallery is wheelchair and walker accessible. If you have specific accessibility needs, please contact us at (604) 683-8326 or info@centre.org.

Centre A is situated on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded Coast Salish territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples. We honour, respect, and give thanks to our hosts.

Artist-In-Residence: Haruko Okano

Haruko Okano, installation view (partial) of Homing Pidgin (2006). Courtesy of the artist.

October 21 – December 14, 2019

Artist Haruko Okano‘s residency at Centre A, titled Homing Pidgin, introduces visitors to words and phrases she recovered from a hybrid trade language that was developed and spoken by early settlers during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Pidgin on the west coast incorporated snippets from Chinese, South Asian, French, and Chinook wau wau woven in with portmanteaus or Janglish (a fusion of Japanese and English). Through printed handouts and magnetic strips, along with a small table, chairs, and place settings symbolizing the meeting of two cultures, the viewers are encouraged to learn a little of a lost oral transition. This residency-installation offers an opportunity to experience the challenges of communicating when one is unfamiliar with another’s mother tongue.

Haruko Okano is a sansei (3rd generation) Japanese Canadian with over 30 years as a professional interdisciplinary artist. Signature characteristics of her practice are deep community engagement, collaborations in the arts and cultural activism. In 2000 she received the VIVA Award from the Doris and Jack Shadbolt Foundation in recognition of her artistic practice. She has extensive training in human rights, and anti-discrimination through the Justice Institute of BC, and the summer human rights college/University of Ottawa. She received her curatorial training through a two-year apprenticeship at the grunt gallery in Vancouver, BC.

Join us for the opening reception on Saturday, October 26, at 12 PM followed by the artist’s Ocean Flotilla workshop from 1 – 4 PM. Light refreshments will be provided.

Workshop: Ocean Flotilla
Free / By donation

Ocean Flotilla is the public participation component of a larger environmental art project started in 2011 by artist Haruko Okano. Ocean Flotilla invites the public’s help in making 1000 paper boats. The boats are made of unbleached kraft paper made water-resistant with Kakishibu, an organic multi-purpose medium from Japan. Each of the boats will be numbered inside so that participants will be able to track their boat’s journey by periodically checking the ocean flotilla BlogSpot. Because this workshop requires precise paper folding and waterproofing in 3 stages the participant age limit is 12 years or older. Younger children accompanied by an adult are welcome to contribute a message during the workshop or through the blog site (mentioned below). Space is limited and participation will be on a first come first serve basis. Visit http://oceanflotilla.blogspot.com for more information about a boat launch.


Accessibility: The gallery is wheelchair and walker accessible. If you have specific accessibility needs, please contact us at (604) 683-8326 or info@centre.org.

Centre A is situated on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded Coast Salish territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples. We honour, respect, and give thanks to our hosts.